Politics

Post-Impeachment Brazil: What happens now?

The events leading up to the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff have been simultaneously traumatic and cathartic for Brazil. As this chapter of Brazilian history draws to a close, many unanswered questions remain. Will the new government have the clout to push through the hard reforms needed to pull Brazil out of its worst ever economic crisis? Will the Lava Jato corruption investigation be allowed to continue, or will politicians get in the way, risking the country’s future to save themselves?

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One of the guys in charge of fixing Brazil’s finances just posted a frustrated but informative Twitter rant - UPDATED

As a Secretary in the Finance Ministry of Michel Temer’s interim government, economist Mansueto Almeida is one of the people tasked with the seemingly impossible task of fixing Brazil’s finances in the face of a crushing recession and a record budget deficit of some R$ 170 billion. Unsurprisingly, he is frustrated. Frustrated with the difficulty of it all, for sure, but even more so with the widespread speculation and unrealistic expectations coming from analysts and commentators about how it should be done.

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What now? The trade-offs and budget cuts needed to fix Brazil’s finances (Entire series)

As Brazil’s interim government gets to work, its main task is fixing Brazil’s finances after identifying a record budget deficit. Although the specter of austerity looms large, the good news is that budget cuts don’t need to affect Brazil’s social programs. The country’s real fiscal problems can be alleviated by addressing large-scale inefficient and wasteful spending elsewhere. The following five-part series examines where some of these savings could come from.

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Largesse and waste in the Brazilian public sector

This is Part III of a five-part series entitled "What now? The trade-offs and budget cuts needed to fix Brazil’s finances." Part III examines inefficient and wasteful spending in Brazil's massive government bureaucracy, particularly with regard to public sector pensions, salaries, and other benefits.

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Subsidies to the wealthy: Bolsa Empresário and a flawed educational system

This is Part II of a five-part series entitled "What now? The trade-offs and budget cuts needed to fix Brazil’s finances." Part II examines the government's provision of subsidies and tax breaks to companies in Brazil, as well as the indirect subsidies provided to wealthy individuals through the country's educational system.

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What now? The trade-offs and budget cuts needed to fix Brazil’s finances

As Brazil’s interim government gets to work, its main task is restoring Brazil’s finances after identifying a record budget deficit. Although the specter of austerity looms large, the good news is that budget cuts don’t need to affect Brazil’s social programs. The country’s real fiscal problems can be alleviated by addressing inefficient and wasteful spending elsewhere – this five-part series examines where some of these savings could come from.

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Why the threat of military intervention in Brazil is overblown

If we consider the current local context, in which Brazil has robust if flawed democratic institutions; the international context, in which terrorism has replaced communism as the global threat du jour; and the regional context, in which leftist regimes all over Latin America are collapsing on their own, it becomes clear that the Brazilian military is not primed to intervene on this occasion. 

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Has the Western media gone too easy on Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff?

It’s time for the media to reconsider the narrative that has been used to describe the Brazilian crisis and to turn a more critical eye to President Rousseff, as well as her predecessor Lula and the Workers’ Party in general. They have, after all, been in charge for the past 13 years, and the economic and political crises and corruption scandals currently tearing Brazil apart have happened on their watch. 

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What is the impeachment in Brazil about? Author of request explains

Yesterday, lawyer and law professor Janaína Paschoal testified before the Brazilian Senate’s Special Impeachment Commission to explain the request that she filed, along with Helio Bicudo and Miguel Reale Jr., for the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. Here is a translated and annotated transcript of her remarks. 

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Impeachment moves forward, stocks move back and the Rio Olympics face new challenges

In a rowdy hearing last Sunday, the lower house of Brazil’s Congress voted to move forward with impeachment proceedings against president Dilma Roussef. Financial markets had a mixed response as enthusiasm for potential new economic policies was tempered by the reality that there are no short-term solutions for Brazil's dire economic situation. Meanwhile, the Rio Olympics experienced new setbacks when a brand new elevated bicycle path in the city collapsed, killing two people, and news broke that several Olympic construction projects may become the target of corruption investigations.

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Political and economic crisis, the Rio Olympics and Internet rights

The political drama in Brazil continued to unfold during what has been an especially eventful week, even by recent standards. In other news, the economic outlook remains bleak, preparations for the Rio Olympics appear to have finally gotten on track, and concerns are being raised about new laws that would affect net neutrality and strengthen censorship on the Brazilian internet.

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